What Makes our Jewellery Ethical & Eco-Friendly?

Our Materials & Supplier

We purchase the bulk of our silver from Palloys, an Australian company with strict ethical guidelines in place regarding to supply chain, workplace practices, and refining systems.

Palloys is fortunate to operate under the Pallion Group umbrella giving them silver supply from their sister company, ABC Refinery, which is London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) accredited.

This accreditation assures the ethical sourcing of their materials (they can trace 100% of their supply chain, to ensure there is no modern slavery or conflict-zone metal in the supply chain), and also comes with the knowledge that their metals are not just ethical but meet strict international guidelines. There are less than 64 refineries in the world that have LBMA accreditation.

ABC Refinery also have the world’s largest green refining capacity, where they use a groundbreaking Acidless Separation System (ALS) which affects the separation of precious metals from other metals using heat and air pressure. (As an aside, they also supply the gold and silver to the Australian Mint!)

In addition, Palloys is a certified member of the Responsible Jewelry Council (RJC). 

What does ‘recycled’ mean in this context?

The silver we use in all our rings, our earrings, our pendants, and most other elements of our work is made from 100% recycled silver.

This is a mix of recycled post consumer goods and internally recycled goods. 

Our supplier takes scrap silver from jewellers, hobbyists, and other industrial uses – even old photographs! – and then refine it back to pure metals.

These recycled elements make up the silver that we use to create our designs.

We also sell our scrap silver back to Palloys to be recycled!

Our Studio

We make all of our jewellery ourselves, in our home studio in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland, Australia. So, our commute involves nothing but walking! And we often walk to the post office to post your jewellery, too.

We have a 6Kw solar system that supplies most of our power (though we are still connected to the grid), and the only water we use is rainwater we collect in our tanks.